Posted in Arizona pioneers, Biographical, Four Corners, Maps

Early Tuba City, Arizona: Records of the Tanners and Foutzes, part 2

Map of the Navajo Nation today.  Notice where Tuba City, Arizona is, and where Farmington, New Mexico is. The Tanner and Foutz families were in Tuba City from about 1877 to 1903, when they moved to the Farmington area (to the town of Kirtland).  When they settled in Tuba City it was not part of the Navajo Reservation, but relocated in 1902/1903 when the reservation was expanded and the townsite was designated for an Indian school.

Tuba City, Arizona was settled by Mormons at the invitation of Tuuvi or “Tuba” as the white people called him, a Hopi leader who was living in the nearby village of Moencopi, 50 miles west of Oraibi Hopi village.  Tuba had a longstanding relationship with the Latter-day Saints, and in fact had been baptized by an early missionary. Tuba City is about 80 miles northeast of Flagstaff, Arizona and 50 miles from the eastern entrance to the Grand Canyon National Park.  It is within the Painted Desert and is on US Route 160 near Arizona State Route 264.  It is 200 miles from Farmington, New Mexico.

It was 1875 when the Mormons accepted his offer and came to stay. There were around fifteen families there.  They were a hardy and industrious bunch, considering it was so far from “civilization” and they farmed under harsh circumstances.  There were underground springs there but it took much effort to build workable irrigation systems for farming.

Joseph Lehi Foutz was officially called as a missionary to the Arizona Mission and “set apart” in 1877.  In LDS Church Missionary Registers, 1860-1959, There was an entry for Joseph L. Foutz on Oct 1877: 64

[abstract] Father is Jacob Foutz, mother is Margaret Mon [sic]. He was born Mar. 16, 1836 in Caldwell County, Missouri, and was baptized in 1844 by Jacob Foutz. He was in the 40th quorum of the Seventies Quorum. He was living in Richfield, Sevier, Utah at the time of his mission call to Arizona, and was set apart 8 Oct 1877 by W. Woodruff. There was no date of return recorded. (LDS Church Missionary Registers, 1860-1959, p. 9, line #652, Jos. L. Foutz entry; microfilm no. CR 301-22 #1, v. 2, bk. B, p. 1700 [133], LDS Church Archives, Salt Lake City, Utah.)

In 1880 the Seth B. Tanner family was enumerated on the census for Yavapai County, living at “Tanner’s Ranch”, while the Joseph L. Foutz family was enumerated right after them, living at “Mowey Abbey”.  This was really Moenave or Moa Avi Springs, just west of the Tuba City present-day site:

More records to come…

Posted in Archives and Libraries, Arizona pioneers, Biographical, Four Corners, Friday Finds, Navajo Reservation, Newspapers

Early Tuba City, Arizona: Records of the Tanner and Foutzes, part 1

My grandmother, Annie Marie Tanner, was born in Tuba City, Arizona on 18 Aug 1901.  I knew she grew up in Kirtland, San Juan County, New Mexico and wondered exactly when and why the family left Arizona.  Tuba City lies within the Navajo Reservation in the northeast corner of Arizona, while Kirtland is just outside the Navajo reservation in the northwest corner of New Mexico.  Using newspaper articles, Congressional records, and correspondence within federal agencies I pieced together the fascinating story of the early Tuba City settlement and will share some of the records in coming weeks , while also highlighting the archives and libraries where the records were found. Briefly, the settlers who had arrived in the 1870s were bought out by the federal government when the Navajo Reservation was expanded to include their property. There is a lot more to the story, though, as the records will reveal.

Here is a newspaper article, “Will Leave Their Homes”,  (November 15, 1902 Coconino Sun, page one, column three) summing up the situation in Tuba City in 1902.  It is blurry because it is a photo of a microfilm image taken at the Arizona State Archives in Phoenix, Arizona.

Note the mention of S.B. Tanner.  That is Seth Benjamin Tanner, father of Joseph Baldwin Tanner and  grandfather of Annie Marie Tanner.  Watch in the coming weeks for records from this interesting period of time in Tuba City, and  the Tanner and Foutz families.

Posted in Arizona pioneers, Obituaries

Obituary of Sophia Isadora Morris Pomeroy, 27 Mar 1953

” ‘Death Takes Mrs. Pomeroy, Mesa Pioneer’ Dora Pomeroy, 79, resident of Mesa since 1883 and wife of former Arizona State Senator Frank T. Pomeroy, died yesterday afternoon at the Southside District hospital. She had been confined in the hospital for the past two weeks.

The Mesa pioneer was born in Rockeville, Utah, on April 10, 1873. At the age of 10, she came to Mesa with her parents in a party of Mormoon pioneers. She attended Mesa schools and the Tempe Normal School.

She married Frank Pomeroy in the Salt Lake Temple on March 28, 1893. The couple would have celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary today. Mr. Pomeroy had come to Mesa in 1877. He was a member of the Arizona House of representatives for two years, a State Senator from 1929-1937, and also a reading clerk in the House for a number of sessions. He is now secretary and treasurer of the Arizona Pioneers Association.
Mrs. Pomeroy was a lifefong member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and had held positions as teacher in both Ward and Stake Sunday School Relief Society and genealogical organization. She was chariman of the family history division of the latter.

Survivors include her husband; two sons, Col. F. Ivan Pomeroy of Phoenix, and Roland of Peoria; three daughters, Mres. Adah Allen, Glendale; Mrs. Margery Stuck, Phoenix; and Mrs. Dorothy Fowler, Tucson; 15 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Funeral services will be conducted at the First Ward chapel, Monday at 3 pm, by Bishop Dale Vance. Friends may call at Meldrum’s mortuary Sunday, from 2-6 pm. Interment will be in Mesa cemetery.”

Obituary on 27 Mar 1953, newspaper unknown, copy in possession of Dayna Jacobs.