Posted in Conferences and workshops, Institutes, Technology

SLIG 2018: (I don’t) know it all

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And the good news is that I don’t need to know it all, because genealogy is an “open book” test. You don’t have to have all knowledge in your head, but you do need to know where to look to get the answers. And coming to SLIG is like reading 20 books in one week! So, halfway through my third day here (remember, I attended SLIG Tech Day on Saturday) I’m fully immersed in my little world of research methodologies and resources. Continue reading “SLIG 2018: (I don’t) know it all”

Posted in Conferences and workshops, Family History Library, Institutes

SLIG 2018: Getting around town

If you’re not a local, or even if you are and you don’t want to worry about bringing a car, you’ll be glad to know Salt Lake City has great public transportation as well as Uber and Lyft options.   If you are coming from the Salt Lake International airport, hop on the Trax green line rail and ride it all the way to the Gallivan stop. Walk around to the west side of the block and you’ll be at the Hilton—SLIG’s home. Continue reading “SLIG 2018: Getting around town”

Posted in Conferences and workshops, Institutes, Software, Technology

A Firsthand Look at Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG): Day 1 – Tech Day

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Curious about what it’s like to attend a genealogy institute?  Follow along as I share observations and experiences during my week at Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG), held annually in Salt Lake City, Utah.  I touched down in Salt Lake City International Airport two days ago and have already begun my adventure. Continue reading “A Firsthand Look at Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG): Day 1 – Tech Day”

Posted in Archives and Libraries, National Archives, Research tips

Learn more about NARA records at “The Twelve Key” blog

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I just came across an excellent blog for any of you who are interested in U.S. National Archives records, and wanted to share a link to it.  It is called The Twelve Key, by Claire Prechtel Kluskens, who is a senior reference and projects archivist at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), Washington, DC.

In my first visit to her blog I learned about the carded medical records for Mexican War volunteers in a link to an article she wrote about it for NGS Magazine in 2014, and I was able to order my great-great grandfather’s medical record from the Mexican War.  According to his pension file, which I obtained years ago, he had been hospitalized when he lost a finger “in a charge made by lancers” at the Battle of Buena Vista.  I am very interested to see his medical record!  I’ll post it here when I receive it.

The Twelve Key website has links to Kluskens’ extensive historical and genealogical publications, as well as research guides she has produced for the National Archives, and syllabus materials for lectures.  You are going to love this website!

Posted in Conferences and workshops

Ancestor Roundup in Seaside, CA – Feb 3, 2018

Just thought I’d put a good word in for the 37th annual Ancestor Roundup, to be held in Seaside, California on February 3, 2018. It’s a bargain at only $20 if you opt for the e-syllabus, and that even includes lunch!

I’ll be presenting four classes:  Evernote Research Tricks, Dayna’s Genealogy Toolkit, Archives and Libraries – Successful Research Onsite and Online, and Washington, D.C. Research Online in Your Jammies.

The keynote speaker will be Karen Clifford, AG, FUGA.  Her keynote presentation is entitled, “New Tools for Successful Research.”  Address for the conference is 1024 Noche Buena, Seaside, CA.

Here is a preview of the class schedule, and the registration form.