Posted in Familysearch, Research tips

New Useful Tool on FamilySearch You Will Love

 

“Various Tools” photo by George Tsartsianidis on Getty Images

I just discovered a new tool on Family Search Family Tree that is soooo helpful.  I don’t know how long it has been on the site, but they are adding new things all the time so maybe it hasn’t been long, or I just haven’t noticed it.  But  it is something that allows you to take all the information that has been indexed from a record, copy it to your clipboard, and paste it in whatever word processor or genealogy program you want, all nicely formatted and with a complete source citation.

Wow, if I had had this years ago it would have saved me a ton of time!

Here is how to access this new tool:

1. Open a person’s page in the FamilySearch Family Tree. Click on FamilySearch on the right side of the page in the “Search Records” area.  This will tell FamilySearch to search for records which match this person in its vast database.

2.  When you see a record that looks like a match in the search results list, click on the document icon to bring up an abstract and possibly an image of the record. (If you see a camera icon you know there will be an image available.)

3.  When the record abstract comes up, click on the “Tools” box.

4.  Under the “Tools” drop down menu click on “Copy to Clipboard”.

5.  Open up a word processor or the notes area of your genealogy program and “Paste”. An abstract of the record, complete with source citation will appear in your document or program!

Keep in mind this only works with records found in the FamilySearch database, and not the other websites linked to the “Search Records” box, but you can experiment with copying and pasting directly from records on Ancestry, Find My Past, and MyHeritage.

Posted in Conferences and workshops, Research tips

RootsTech 2018 – And You Are [Not] There

I was not invited to Prom in 1975.  Not that I am bitter.  But have you ever felt left out?  Sometimes I feel that way when RootsTech rolls around. It’s like Prom for 20,000 genealogists, minus the disco ball and awkward photos (it was the 70s, ya know!)

It seems like everyone is going, and maybe you wish you could be there but it’s not happening for one reason or another.  I hear your *sigh* and want you to know I’m here for you.  There’s no need to feel like everyone else but you is going to the party. I’m not bitter.  In fact, I’m kinda excited, because RootsTech has made it possible for all of us to join in the fun!  Here is a link to their online streaming schedule so once a day you can put on your tuxedo or ball gown, settle in to a comfortable armchair, and soak up the RootsTech vibes. Continue reading “RootsTech 2018 – And You Are [Not] There”

Posted in Conferences and workshops, Institutes, Research tips

SLIG 2018: Need to change up your lunch options?

After five days at SLIG you might want to add some variety to your life by trying out a new lunch spot. Did you know there are some great little places within a block and a half of the Hilton? Just head east on Broadway (300 S.) and cross Main Street to find a cluster of eateries you might not know about. Some I have tried, and some come highly recommended by my son, who worked a few blocks away for ten years. On Main Street you will find J-Dawgs for amazing and cheap hot dogs. Continue reading “SLIG 2018: Need to change up your lunch options?”

Posted in Conferences and workshops, Institutes

SLIG 2018: Genealogy and Chinese New Year

On a lunch break from SLIG yesterday, I decided to go out for Chinese food and got a nice surprise when I opened my fortune cookie. What genealogist wouldn’t want to have a fortune like this?

I’m looking forward to the Year of the Dog!

Posted in Conferences and workshops, Institutes, Technology

SLIG 2018: (I don’t) know it all

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And the good news is that I don’t need to know it all, because genealogy is an “open book” test. You don’t have to have all knowledge in your head, but you do need to know where to look to get the answers. And coming to SLIG is like reading 20 books in one week! So, halfway through my third day here (remember, I attended SLIG Tech Day on Saturday) I’m fully immersed in my little world of research methodologies and resources. Continue reading “SLIG 2018: (I don’t) know it all”