“…I dont have time to get loansome…”

[This is 12th in a series of letters written by Private A.L. Gooch to his family in Duncan Arizona, while he served in France during WWI.  This letter was written sometime in 1918, but is otherwise undated.

Original letters are in possession of Dayna Gooch Jacobs, King City, California. Envelope missing. Transcribed by Dayna Jacobs. Slashes in the transcription indicate line breaks.  Links to other letters: 1 2 4 5 6 7 8  10 11]

1918

Dear Mother,

At first chance I am writting you a few/ lines to let you / know I am still/ living and enjoying/ life.  There is many things I would like/ to say.  And probly can/ latter.  I have been/ very sick for the past/ few days with a cold/ in my lungs.  But/feel fine now./  Well I am still seeing/ sights and enjoying/ them very much. This/ is a very pretty world/

[p2] over here.  But it cant compare with the/ good old U.S.A.

Please mother dear/ dont worry about me/ for I dont have time/ to get loansome and/ I am realy enjoying/ myself.  I will write/ you every chance I get/ Tell all hell’o and be/ good untill I returne.

With love and kisses to All,

Your Son

Nig

Pvt.

Troop R.  [?] 314th M.P. 89 div.

American Expeditionary Forces

 

*NEW* – Portrait trees on FamilySearch

I try to keep you posted on new things happening at FamilySearch Family Tree – at least the things I get excited about and think you will like, too.  Recently they added the option of viewing your tree as a “portrait” tree.  See how spiffy it looks?

FamilySearch Portrait Tree for Dayna Jacobs

FamilySearch Portrait Tree for Dayna Jacobs

I love it!  The photos make my tree come alive and is easy to navigate.  Click on the “up” arrows to see more generations.  Click on the “down” arrows to see descendants.

Click on up and down arrows to see additional generations of ancestors or descendants

Click on up and down arrows to see additional generations of ancestors or descendants

You can access information for any of the individuals by clicking on their box.  A box will appear that allows you to see at a glance how many sources, memories (stories and photos), or discussions they have, as well as birth and death data, their I.D. numbers, and an option to “watch” the individual if you would like to be notified when changes are made to that individual’s record.  LDS members will also see a “temple” area.

Click on any of these links, or click on “person” to see more details, or click on “tree” to center this person on a tree view.

Click to see a summary box pop up.

Click to see a summary box pop up.

If you want to change the picture that shows up in the circle by the name, click on it and you will be given the option to use other photos you have previously uploaded.

If you have not created or discovered your tree on FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org) I encourage you to give it a try.  It’s entirely free and will remain that way.  It is functions hand-in-hand with the millions of digitized records on the site and is bound to help you find records you had not known about previously.

When viewing a person’s detail page, just click on the “Search records” link and it will pull up all kinds of digitized records that you can then attach to the individual.

Clicking on Search Records will pull up records from millions of digitized records on FamilySearch

Clicking on Search Records will pull up records from millions of digitized records on FamilySearch

I never know what new thing I’ll discover on FamilySearch Family Tree, but I will be sure to keep you posted so you can have fun, too.

“You…never can begin to amagine what we boys went through…” WWI victory at last!

This gallery contains 7 photos.

[This is 11th in a series of letters written by Private A.L. Gooch to his family in Duncan Arizona, while he served in France during WWI.  This letter was written 28 Nov 1918, two weeks after Armistice---the end of the war.  Up until this time, Nig (as he was known) could not disclose details about … Continue reading

Desktop Genealogy Program or Online Family Tree?

Have you wondered whether you should bother to use a desktop genealogy program now that online family trees are popular and feature-filled?  Folks ask me this all the time.

Donald Duck Family Tree

Donald Duck Family Tree

In today’s edition of the RootsMagic News (RootsMagic is a popular desktop program) an article by Renee Zamora appeared which discusses this and sums up the reasons why both are useful for genealogists.  She gave her permission to reprint the article in the RootsMagic News, and provided a PDF version that is shareable.  I liked it enough to share here.   Check it out for yourself.

For the question of which desktop genealogy program is best, I always tell folks to download the trial version of programs they are interested in.  Most of the major programs, such as RootsMagic, Legacy Family Tree, Ancestral Quest, and Family Tree Maker, have a free trial or basic version.  The best program will be the one that feels most intuitive to you.

Simpsons Family Tree

Simpsons Family Tree

They all are powerful and are likely to have everything you could hope for, but it comes down to which one you will actually feel comfortable using.  It doesn’t matter how robust a program is if you are overwhelmed or confused by it.  So give them all a test-drive like I did, and settle on the one that feels best.  I happen to use Legacy Family Tree because it suits the way I research and organize myself, but you may prefer one of the other excellent choices.

Celebrating with a Fun Podcast

Well, On Granny’s Trail just topped 16,000 views, so to celebrate this random achievement, I decided to share a fun podcast with you from Stuff You Missed in History Class that will help you learn a little more about the Western States.  Stuff You Missed in History Class researched the true story and presented their findings in this podcast.

The Baron of Arizona, starring Vincent Price and Ellen Dres

The Baron of Arizona, starring Vincent Price and Ellen Drew (This is the movie version, not the podcast)

It’s called “The Peralta Grant and the Baron of Arizona,” and is quite entertaining.   It’s about a determined would-be swindler and how he nearly acquired an enormous portion of Arizona for himself.  Genealogists will be interested in his creative forgery and the prodigious amount of  “proof” he produced to claim his grant.

And to think my ancestors might have ended up with this guy (James Addison Reaves, not Vincent Price) as their landlord!

Vincent Price as the Baron of Arizona

Vincent Price as the Baron of Arizona

You can also check out the link to the blog post about this podcast for a few more resources on the topic.

Enjoy the podcast, and thanks for following On Granny’s Trail!